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Safe Ride Home Program Launches on Montana Tech Campus


Montana Tech’s student government, the Associated Students of Montana Tech (ASMT), recently launched a new program on campus in order to keep students safe on the weekends. The program, called ASMT Safe Rides, encourages students not to drink and drive.

In the past, ASMT provided a safe ride home for students during Mulletfest, but a service year round was needed. Other universities across Montana provide similar programs so Montana Tech’s ASMT felt a program on campus was needed. ASMT Senator Rob Corson began working on this project last year but was unable to get the project rolling. He ran for a senator position again in 2014 in order to get the project up and running before he graduates in May with a degree in petroleum engineering. 

“The idea for this program started after the accident in 2012, which involved Montana Tech students and drunk driving. The accident greatly affected our campus, including a lot of people close to me,” explained Corson. “That was a real eye opener for me personally. When tragedy hits close to home, it makes you realize how severe the consequences of drunk driving can be. It made us realize as a Senate that there was a need at Montana Tech to provide a service for the students.”

In order to get the project rolling, Corson formed a committee with ASMT senators and Montana Tech Vice Chancellor Maggie Peterson. The committee explored options for operation of the program and determined it was best for the program to partner with Mary Garcia with Mining City Taxi. The program officially began on October 30, 2014 and has transported 107 Montana Tech students during the hours of 8:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The program works when Montana Tech students call Mining City Taxi and present their Digger Card to the driver. The driver then gives the student a ride and Mining City Taxi bills Montana Tech. The university has put up $10,000 for the program. According to Corson, Montana Tech Chancellor Don Blackketter and the Executive Team played a big role in getting this program started. “Without financial support from the university, this service would have taken longer to become available.”

The committee has a number of future plans for the program. They would like to eventually transition the program to run through the students. “For now, we want to make sure our students are safe and know the service is available. We encourage all Montana Tech students to use it,” added Corson.

“College students are going to drink, the important thing is to have services in place to ensure everyone makes it home safely,” said Corson. “If this program keeps even one person from driving drunk and getting a DUI, or worse causing harm to themselves or others, then that makes this program worth it in my eyes.”

For more information, please contact Rob Corson at 406-321-0892 or rdcorson@mtech.edu